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Food For Health: are you what you eat?

How many of us honestly understand where our food comes from? From now until the end of March, the Canadian Agriculture touring Food For Health exhibit will be providing answers while on display at the Western Development Museum in Saskatoon.
Loretta bird and brian ketlo fish with a homemade net on the nadleh river.

Line In The Sand: USask students track path of Enbridge pipeline

For 14 days in late July and early August, two University of Saskatchewan students travelled the 1,772-kilometre route of Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. During this time they took photos, captured video and documented the personal stories of residents of the communities along the pipeline’s projected path.
Bert Weichel built his home using straw bales as exterior walls, which he argues is cheap and environmentally-friendly.

U of S lecturer builds cheap, green straw house: construction prohibited within city limits

Not even the Big Bad Wolf has the lungs to topple this straw house. Bert Weichel, a University of Saskatchewan geography and environmental studies lecturer, has built himself a home just south-west of Saskatoon using straw bale construction. He says humans have been using straw structures for centuries, and that it is a cheap and eco-friendly alternative to conventional building materials.
Even with these ballin’ garbage cans, the U of S still lags on sustainability.

Campus sustainability: U of S ranks as one of the least environmentally friendly universities in Canada

The word “sustainable” is seemingly everywhere. It gets a lot of use by corporations to make their products seem more Earth-friendly than they really are, leaving consumers with a somewhat fuzzy idea of what the word means; is it really better for the environment or simply an attempt to jump on the green bandwagon? For the University of Saskatchewan's Office of Sustainability, the former seems to be the case. The U of S has been increasing commitments to making the campus more environmentally friendly, and the Office of Sustainability plays a large role in that.
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Dear Mr. Harper: thanks for making Canada a Kyoto drop-out

Dear Mr. Harper, I’ve always been a big fan of your policies, and I can’t tell you how excited I was on May 2 when I watched the final numbers roll in and you gained a majority government. But it was on Dec. 11, 2011, that you won a very special place in my heart. It was on this day that your minister of the environment, Peter Kent, officially announced Canada would be the first country in the world to withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol. A decision like that is just pure Stephen Harper gold.
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Advocacy group sheds light on the necessity of composting

On Sunday, Sept. 11, the Saskatoon Farmers' Market was host to a composting exhibition put on by environmental advocacy group Saskatchewan Waste Reduction Council. The overall goal of the event was to shed some light on what composting is, how it works and why it should be a mainstream practice, similar to recycling.
Open air markets are a good source of local produce

The 100-mile diet: local eating is challenging, but rewarding

Trying to eat food that wasn't shipped across the world can be hard. This is even more so when you limit yourself to food grown within 100 miles. Especially in Saskatchewan ”” in the winter. But just because it is hard to make the transition doesn't mean it's not well worth it. Eating local is great for a variety of reasons: you get to support your local farmers and economy, reduce your carbon footprint and know where your food is actually coming from.