Undergraduate Project Symposium returns for second year

Science Fair

To celebrate student work, the second annual Undergraduate Project Symposium will be hosted by the University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union on Jan. 28.

Moving from its previous location in the Arts Tunnel to the North Concourse of Place Riel, USSU Vice-President Academic Jordan Sherbino said he is looking forward to this year’s symposium.

Individual colleges already feature similar events that are exclusive to their own college, however the symposium is the only event of its kind on campus — one that is open to students from all colleges.

“I’m excited to do it again,” Sherbino said. “I thought it was a really good thing and it’s a gap with what the university provides with undergraduate students.”

This year the symposium will highlight the university’s six signature areas — Aboriginal scholarship, water security, synchrotron sciences, agricultural byproducts, energy and mineral resources and health issues affecting the animal-human environment nexus.

By focussing on these areas of research, Sherbino said he hopes the symposium will show students how the varied work they do can fit into larger areas of study at the U of S.

The symposium will “get undergraduate students knowing that what they do in their classes doesn’t just have to be for their classes, it could be part of a greater scholarship in these areas,” he said.

Sherbino also took a more hands-on approach this year when advertising the symposium. He set out to researchers on campus asking if they knew any students that would be interested in participating in the symposium.

As a result, Sherbino said there were more applicants than last year. However, because the symposium is still in its early years, only 20 students have been selected to showcase their work at the symposium. Sherbino said he hopes to see the symposium grow to need a larger venue such as the Education Gym.

Angie Lang, recent graduate from the College of Kinesiology and participant in last year’s symposium, said the colloquy was a great way to prepare for graduate studies where she will be presenting other projects.

“I would certainly recommend participating in [the symposium], especially to someone that is interested in continuing on into graduate studies,” Lang wrote to the Sheaf via email.

First-place will receive the grand prize of $1,000 while second, third and fourth places take home $700, $500 and $200 respectively. Passersby will have the opportunity to vote on their favorite project for the people’s choice award of $200. A prize of $200 will also be awarded a project that best fits in one of the university’s signature areas.

The USSU has worked in collaboration with Student Enrolment Services Division, the University Learning Center, Consumer Services Division and the Office of the Vice-President Research.


Graphic: Cody Schumacher/Graphics Editor